Menu

Refactual

We publish EVERYTHING sent to publish@refactual.com

With back pain, getting out of bed can help

If you have back pain, bed rest can be useful but too much time in bed can do more harm than good.

Focus on Back Pain
ISSUE #2 OF 6 IN AN E-MAIL SERIES
Harvard Medical School

With back pain, getting out of bed can help

If you have back pain, bed rest can be useful, especially if you are in severe pain while sitting and standing. But it’s best to limit bed rest during the day to a few hours at a time, for no more than a couple of days. That’s because too much time in bed can do more harm than good.

If you need to be horizontal, lie down on a bed or sofa, in any comfortable position. To ease the strain on your back, try putting pillows under your head and between your knees when lying on your side, under your knees when lying on your back, or under your hips when lying on your stomach. These positions reduce the forces that sitting or standing impose on the back — especially on the disks, ligaments, and muscles.

Back Pain

Treatment of low back pain has undergone a recent sea change. Experts now appreciate the central role of exercise to build muscles that support the back. This Special Health Report, Back Pain: Finding solutions to heal your aching back, helps you understand why back pain occurs and which treatments are most likely to help. This report describes the different types of back problems and the tailored treatments that are more likely to help specific conditions.

Read More

Bed rest is no longer the go-to treatment for moderate back strain. Although it does minimize stress on the lower spine, it can also create other problems. Too much time in bed weakens muscles, including those needed to support the back. Some people develop gastrointestinal problems, such as constipation. Inactivity also boosts the chances of developing a blood clot in the veins of your pelvis and legs. This can hurt, and damage the affected vein. If a piece of the clot breaks away, it can lodge in the lungs. This condition, called pulmonary embolism, can be deadly.

But there’s another good reason to limit bed rest: well-designed research trials show that an early return to physical activity or work — with some restrictions or light duty, if necessary — is preferable to bed rest and staying home from work for an extended period.

What type of mattress is best for people with low back pain?

If you are like most people, you spend roughly one-third of your life in bed. So it’s worth taking a few minutes to think about whether your mattress is giving you, and your back, the support you need.

There hasn’t been a great deal of research on this topic, yet a few studies offer some guidance. In the past, doctors often recommended very firm mattresses. But in one study, in which 313 people slept on a medium-firm or firm mattress for three months, those with the medium-firm mattresses reported less pain when lying in bed as well as less pain-related disability compared with those with the firm mattresses. Another report, based on a waiting-room survey of 268 patients with low back pain, found that people who slept on orthopedic (very firm) mattresses had the poorest sleep quality, while there was no difference in sleep quality between medium and firm mattresses.

While a softer mattress that conforms to your body’s natural curves may help your joints align favorably, you might also sink in so deeply that your joints twist and become painful during the night.

One way to find your dream mattress is to try out different ones. If you spend a night at a hotel or in someone else’s house, make note of how you feel after sleeping on the “new” bed. You can also try putting a plywood board under your current mattress (which will dampen any movement from bedsprings) or sleep for a few nights with your mattress on the floor (which simulates the feeling of a firm bed).

For more on healing your aching back, buy Back Pain, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.

Featured in this issue

Product Page - Back Pain Read More

Back Pain

Featured content:

Why does your back hurt?
The anatomy of your back
Causes of back pain
Diagnosing back pain
Creating a treatment strategy
•  … and more!

Click here to read more »

Harvard Medical School offers special reports on over 60 health topics.
Visit our website at http://www.health.harvard.edu to find reports of interest to you and your family.

PHONE ORDERS – please call our toll-free number: 1-877-6499457.


You are currently subscribed to Focus On as publish@refactual.com.

UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THIS FOCUS ON SERIES
SUBSCRIBE TO OTHER FOCUS ON SERIES
VIEW ARTICLE ARCHIVES

Visit our website at: www.health.harvard.edu
Email us at: healthbeat@health.harvard.edu

FOLLOW US ON:  Facebook Twitter

Copyright © 2018 by Harvard University.
Harvard Health Publishing, 4 Blackfan Circle, 4th Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA

* Please note, we do not provide responses to personal medical concerns, nor can we supply related medical information other than what is available in our print products or website. For specific, personalized medical advice we encourage you to contact your physician.

 

Leave a Reply